Josh Tycko


Systematic discovery of protein functions in human cells to understand gene regulation and enable gene therapy


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Josh Tycko


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Department of Neurobiology


Harvard Medical School




Josh Tycko


Systematic discovery of protein functions in human cells to understand gene regulation and enable gene therapy



Department of Neurobiology


Harvard Medical School



Direct profiling of genome-wide dCas9 and Cas9 specificity using ssDNA mapping (CasKAS)


Journal article


G. Marinov, Samuel H. Kim, S. Bagdatli, Alexandro E. Trevino, Josh Tycko, Tong Wu, Lacramioara Bintu, M. Bassik, Chuan He, A. Kundaje, W. Greenleaf
bioRxiv, 2021

Semantic Scholar DOI
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Cite

APA
Marinov, G., Kim, S. H., Bagdatli, S., Trevino, A. E., Tycko, J., Wu, T., … Greenleaf, W. (2021). Direct profiling of genome-wide dCas9 and Cas9 specificity using ssDNA mapping (CasKAS). BioRxiv.

Chicago/Turabian
Marinov, G., Samuel H. Kim, S. Bagdatli, Alexandro E. Trevino, Josh Tycko, Tong Wu, Lacramioara Bintu, et al. “Direct Profiling of Genome-Wide dCas9 and Cas9 Specificity Using SsDNA Mapping (CasKAS).” bioRxiv (2021).

MLA
Marinov, G., et al. “Direct Profiling of Genome-Wide dCas9 and Cas9 Specificity Using SsDNA Mapping (CasKAS).” BioRxiv, 2021.


Abstract

Detecting and mitigating off-target activity is critical to the practical application of CRISPR-mediated genome and epigenome editing. While numerous methods have been developed to map Cas9 binding specificity genome-wide, they are generally time-consuming and/or expensive, and not applicable to catalytically dead CRISPR enzymes. We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and facile assay for identifying off-target CRISPR enzyme binding and cleavage by chemically mapping the unwound single-stranded DNA structures formed upon binding of a sgRNA-loaded Cas9 protein (“CasKAS”). We demonstrate this method in both in vitro and in vivo contexts.


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