Josh Tycko


Systematic discovery of protein functions in human cells to understand gene regulation and enable gene therapy


Contact

Josh Tycko


Contact description



Department of Neurobiology


Harvard Medical School




Josh Tycko


Systematic discovery of protein functions in human cells to understand gene regulation and enable gene therapy



Department of Neurobiology


Harvard Medical School



About


I develop new high-throughput, synthetic biology technologies to manipulate and measure human gene regulation.

I develop systematic experimental technologies that enable progress toward a quantitative understanding of gene expression while keeping the door open for unexpected biological discoveries. Recently, we developed a new approach, HT-recruit, to measure how domains from all proteins in the human nucleus can affect gene expression when recruited to a target gene. We discovered transcriptional effector domains in 600 human proteins and shed new light on the evolution of major transcription factor families, like KRAB and Hox.

My long-term goal is to apply this knowledge to develop safe gene therapies that cure diseases. I have employed a variety of high-throughput methods to better measure, model, and mitigate CRISPR gene editing off-target activity, working in both academia and at a biotech startup.

I completed my Ph.D. in the labs of Michael Bassik and Lacra Bintu with support from the NIH F99/K00 Fellowship.  At Stanford, I was a teaching assistant for a course on the science and bioethics of CRISPR, was an instructor for a hands-on cell engineering lab, and mentor to our amazing iGEM team. As a BioFutures Fellow and co-leader of The Genetics Advocacy Committee, I collaborated with fellow trainees to critically analyze and improve graduate STEM training.

Please reach out if you would like to chat!
Share